squint /skwɪnt/
verb
1 [no object] look at someone or something with one or both eyes partly closed in an attempt to see more clearly or as a reaction to strong light:
the bright sun made them squint.
• [with object] partly close (one's eyes) in an attempt to see more clearly or as a reaction to strong light.
2 [no object] have eyes that look in different directions:
Melanie did not squint.
• (of a person's eye) have a deviation in the direction of its gaze:
her left eye squinted slightly.
noun
1 [in singular] a permanent deviation in the direction of the gaze of one eye:
I had a bad squint.
2 [in singular]
informal a quick or casual look: let me have a squint.
3 an oblique opening through a

wall in a church permitting a view of the altar from an aisle or side chapel.

THESAURUS
squint /skwɪnt/
verb
1
the sun made them squint: SCREW UP ONE'S EYES, narrow one's eyes, peer, blink.
2
he has squinted from birth: BE CROSS-EYED, have a squint, suffer from strabismus.
noun
1 informal
we must have another squint at his records: LOOK, glance, peep, peek, glimpse; view, examination, study, inspection, scan, sight; informal eyeful, gander, look-see, once-over.
2
does he have a squint? CROSS-EYES, strabismus.

ORIGIN
mid 16th century (in the sense ‘
squinting’, as in squint-eyed): shortening of asquint.
entice /ɪnˈtʌɪs, enˈtʌɪs/
verb [with object]
attract or tempt by offering pleasure or advantage:
a show that should entice a new audience into the theater | [with object and infinitive] : the whole purpose of bribes is to entice governments to act against the public interest.

THESAURUS
entice /ɪnˈtʌɪs, enˈtʌɪs/
verb
he tried to entice us by promising a screen test at his studio: TEMPT, lure, allure, attract, appeal to; invite, persuade, convince, beguile, coax, woo, court; seduce, lead on; informal sweet-talk.

ORIGIN
Middle English (also in the sense ‘incite, provoke’; formerly also as
intice): from Old French enticier, probably from a base meaning ‘set on fire’, based on an alteration of Latin titio ‘firebrand’.

CHOOSE THE RIGHT WORD
These notes show fine distinctions in meaning between closely related synonyms to help you find the best word.

tempt, allure, beguile, entice, inveigle, lure, seduce
When we are under the influence of a powerful attraction, particularly to something that is wrong or unwise, we are tempted. Entice implies that a crafty or skillful person has attracted us by offering a reward or pleasure (she was enticed into joining the group by a personal plea from its handsome leader), while inveigle suggests that we are enticed through the use of deception or cajolery (inveigled into supporting the plan). If someone lures us, it suggests that we have been tempted or influenced for fraudulent or destructive purposes or attracted to something harmful or evil (lured by gang members). Allure may also suggest that we have been deliberately tempted against our will, but the connotations here are often sexual (allured by her dark green eyes). Seduce carries heavy sexual connotations (seduced by an older woman), although it can simply mean prompted to action against our will (seduced by a clever sales pitch). While beguile at one time referred exclusively to the use of deception to lead someone astray, nowadays it can also refer to the use of subtle devices to lead someone on (a local festival designed to beguile the tourists).